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Anchor Trolley

By Chad Harvey

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Anchor Trolley


For kayak positioning while anchored, you will need an anchor trolley. There are many stores that offer ready made anchor trolleys, which is fine, but I like to build my own. I like to use 4mm black Niteline rope for its reflective properties and again, all stainless steel hardware. I also don't drill any holes in the kayak for my installation, I just use the handles on the kayak. This allows me to have a front and rear trolley that work independently from one another and I can easily switch the trolley from the left side of the kayak to the right. Or, I can take it off without leaving any hardware on the kayak.


The hardware I use (from left to right) stainless hog rings, stainless snaps, stainless pulleys, heat shrink, and a couple of pieces of 1/4" bungie. Not pictured are a pair of 2” stainless rings.

Anchor Trolley

First, slide a piece of heat shrink onto the bungie and make a loop, securing it with two hog rings. This method will be used to make all of my attachments.


Anchor Trolley

Using hog ring pliers is the best way to crimp down the hog rings. You can use other types of pliers, but be prepared for some of the rings to fire out of the pliers when you try to crimp them.

Anchor Trolley

 

This is what properly crimped hog rings should look like.

Anchor Trolley

To make the connection between the bungie and the pulley, I use a stainless snap. Some people like to install the pulley in the loop of bungie, but I feel that the edge where the bungie rests on the pulley is too sharp for this, and these clips have a smoother surface for the bungie. Also, if a pulley fails, you can replace it without having to make a new bungie loop. After all, once that heat shrink is tightened up against those crimped hog rings, its about impossible to get them apart.

Anchor Trolley

I take the bungie loop and place it through the handle at the middle of the kayak, bend it in half, and clip each half into the stainless clip with the pulley already on it. The bungie loop takes up slack in the trolley and provides some shock absorption for the anchor line.

Anchor Trolley

Next, clip a second clip and pulley onto the rear handle of the kayak. Note that there is NOT a bungie loop on the rear, it isn't necessary and without one, you can get the anchor line closer to the rear of the boat. Run the Niteline through the pulleys with the tag ends facing towards the ground.


Anchor Trolley

Run the other end of the Niteline through the pulley on the other handle.


Anchor Trolley

Now make another connection to a third clip at the tag end of the Niteline that is towards the rear of the kayak. Don't forget to slip on a piece of heat shrink here too! Secure the connection with two hog rings.

Anchor Trolley

Pull the Niteline taught, but not super tight, and determine where you will place a 2" stainless ring that will clip onto the stainless clip. Make another connection with hog rings and heat shrink.

Anchor Trolley

This is what you should have so far. Note that I have not yet secured any of the heat shrink until I have everything where I want it.

Anchor Trolley

And again, after the heat shrink was secured. I use a candle and hold the heat shrink overtop of the flame until it shrinks.

Anchor Trolley Anchor Trolley

Repeat the whole process for the front trolley and you are all done!

See all of Chad's How-To install over at Kayak Bass Fishing